1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Welcome to Stafford Forum. Please or sign-up and start posting!

Gluten free diet

Discussion in 'Lifestyle, Health & Diet' started by kyoto49, May 12, 2016.

  1. kyoto49

    kyoto49 Well-Known Forumite

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Messages:
    2,521
    Likes Received:
    1,458
    Is anyone on a gluten free diet? I'm trying to stay gluten free, 2 days so far, as I have an illness that I've read is improved by being gluten free. It's almost impossible!! Seems that prior to going gluten free I lived solely on gluten judging by how many of the foods i ate daily that I can no longer eat! Had never given it a thought really as I eat pretty healthily bar my jaffa cake addiction!

    Breakfast was porridge - at's no longer allowed

    Dinner was sandwiches - they are no longer allowed

    Tea was Pasta or tortilla's, or noodles - none of them are allowed

    Supper was jaffa cakes and Ovaltine - none fo them are allowed!!

    It's a nightmare!

    Obviously those carbs mentioned are allowed eaten with copious amounts of nuts/pulses/fruits and vegetables, but bar rice and potattoes I'm at a complete loss as to how I will manage without bread/cakes/biscuits/ovaltine/pasta and everything thing else in my diet that contains gluten!!!

    Any suggestions please?


    Admin Edit: Gluten free posts moved to their own thread.
     
  2.  


    Click here to register and never see these adverts again!

  3. Gramaisc

    Gramaisc Forum O. G.

    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Messages:
    46,066
    Likes Received:
    18,753
    Sainsbury's have these.

    [​IMG]
     
    Lunar Scorpion and kyoto49 like this.
  4. Glam

    Glam Mad Cat Woman

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2010
    Messages:
    8,194
    Likes Received:
    4,319
    Sainsburys stock a lot of gluten free stuff. It don't come cheap tho. £2.50 for a loaf of bread!
     
  5. Gramaisc

    Gramaisc Forum O. G.

    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Messages:
    46,066
    Likes Received:
    18,753
    Coeliac disease is very popular in Ireland and the indigenous supermarkets there all have large sections of non-gluten and other 'specialist' items.

    [​IMG]
     
    Lunar Scorpion likes this.
  6. Noah

    Noah Well-Known Forumite

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2012
    Messages:
    3,187
    Likes Received:
    1,923
    Most ofthe major supermarket chains have "free from" ranges, including gluten free, on the shelves and in the freezer sections. As Glam said, they ain't cheap.
     
    kyoto49 likes this.
  7. Trumpet

    Trumpet Well-Known Forumite

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2009
    Messages:
    7,457
    Likes Received:
    3,734
    Never heard of gluten or gluten free foods 20 years ago. Is this a latter day thing like nut allergies also unheard of 20 years ago.
    Not being insensitive to sufferers dietary requirements, just asking.
     
    proactive likes this.
  8. Gramaisc

    Gramaisc Forum O. G.

    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Messages:
    46,066
    Likes Received:
    18,753
    It's been around for a long time - people just suffered unpleasantness. The Coeliacs that I know weren't in a life-threatening situation before they were diagnosed, but things were difficult enough. It's not like the anaphylactic shock thing with some nut allergies, that will kill you now.

    There is a spectrum to a lot of these things. I remember a kid with a nut allergy in the 1960s.
     
    Trumpet likes this.
  9. kyoto49

    kyoto49 Well-Known Forumite

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Messages:
    2,521
    Likes Received:
    1,458
    Back then our diets weren't full of additives, preservatives, chemicals and all the other general shite that big pharma and food manufacturers put in to the food chain to ellicit profit rather than the health of the population.

    I eat organic, I grow my own fruit & veg where possible, I cook everything from scratch, no processed sauces, in fact we eat very little processed food, bar jaffa cakes and ovaltine :) but I still know that food today isn't what it was when I was growing up and the veg still had mud and slugs on it!! If poeple don't think there is a link between processed food, huge profits to food manufacturers and the decline in people's health and rise in obesity they are deluded. Awareness of the impact of food on health, such as gluten intolerance is just increased knowledge!

    You are what you eat is never more true!
     
    proactive and littleme like this.
  10. Noah

    Noah Well-Known Forumite

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2012
    Messages:
    3,187
    Likes Received:
    1,923
    There is significant evidence that exposure to birch pollen is implicated in nut allergy. The main allergenic protien in birch pollen is very similar to one in peanuts and some nuts, some people's immune system is not able to distinguish between the two so if they have become sensitised to birch pollen they may react strongly to nuts. This pollen-food cross-reaction may also be responsible for soya allergy as again soya contains very large amounts of a protein which cross-reacts to birch pollen.

    "Oral allergy syndrome, also known as pollen-food syndrome,is caused by cross-reacting allergens found in both pollen and raw fruits, vegetables, or some tree nuts. The immune system recognizes the pollen and similar proteins in the food and directs an allergic response to it. People affected by oral allergy syndrome can usually eat the same fruits or vegetables in cooked form because the proteins are distorted during the heating process, so that the immune system no longer recognizes the food.

    Oral allergy syndrome typically does not appear in young children; the onset is more common in older children, teens, and young adults who have been eating the fruits or vegetables in question for years without any problems. Those with oral allergy syndrome typically have allergy to birch, ragweed, or grass pollens." (http://acaai.org/allergies/types/food-allergies/types-food-allergy/oral-allergy-syndrome)

    Birch has been widely planted in residential areas since the 1970s to replace non-native ornemental trees, it is cheap and easy to grow, shallow rooted and promoted by council tree officers!
     
    kyoto49 and littleme like this.
  11. db

    db #chaplife

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2006
    Messages:
    8,839
    Likes Received:
    466
    fewer than 1% of the population are intolerant of gluten, but the diet industry has sufficiently demonised it to make it a very lucrative trendy diet option.. the irony being, of course, is that gluten free options are usually much unhealthier for 99% of people, since they contain far more sugar than the standard alternative:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/...ld-damage-health-of-people-without-coeliac-d/

    http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/feb/25/gluten-free-diet-life-saving-fad

    even if that is true, gluten has nothing to do with "additives, preservatives, [and] chemicals" - gluten is a protein in wheat and other grains, so humankind has been eating it for tens of thousands of years.. fair enough, modern intensive baking methods have changed some of the properties of the gluten that is in the food that we eat, but it's still a naturally occurring protein (or group of proteins) that do no harm to almost the entire population..

    not disagreeing with you, incidentally - i agree with everything above, and i too try to make as much stuff from scratch as i can - but the gluten free thing is an exercise in expensive futility that will end up costing you more and could result in a higher sugar intake, if that's something that you try to keep an eye on..
     
    Withnail likes this.
  12. littleme

    littleme 250,000th poster!

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2012
    Messages:
    8,573
    Likes Received:
    4,375
    Ooooo I forgot to reply to this ... try cauliflower rice or spiralised vegetables as an alternative to pasta/rice. :)
     
  13. kyoto49

    kyoto49 Well-Known Forumite

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Messages:
    2,521
    Likes Received:
    1,458
  14. citricsquid

    citricsquid Well-Known Forumite

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    405
    That's an interesting idea but the cited research is flawed apparently, the research cited ("Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance") draws conclusions based on a (flawed) study into the impact of Glyphosate on fish. Here's a response from Steve Savage (Independent Expert):

    Certainly worth removing treated wheat from your diet as your own experiment though because it's possible that while the research is flawed there could still be other problems as yet undiscovered by researchers, but that specific article is flawed.
     
  15. kyoto49

    kyoto49 Well-Known Forumite

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2009
    Messages:
    2,521
    Likes Received:
    1,458
    Whether the research is flawed or not, the idea that dousing food liberally in any sort of chemicals is bad enough. To drench a crop with harmful chemicals two days before harvest for no other reason than profit is abhorrent.
     
  16. Noah

    Noah Well-Known Forumite

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2012
    Messages:
    3,187
    Likes Received:
    1,923
    Some interesting recent work throws some doubt as to whether glutens are the real problem for most people. About 1% of the population have coeliac disease and do have a serious reaction to glutens. However another 12%+ of the population feel ill after eating foods such as bread and pasta while not having coeliac disease. Now there is a suggestion that the real problem for these people is not gluten but sugar chains called fructans which are often found in the same foods as glutens - such as wheat, barley, rye & onions. Soy sauce is high in gluten but low in fructan and the fermentation process used in making sourdough bread strips out any fructans. So if you have gastrointestinal problems but can eat soy and sourdough bread your problem may not be gluten but fructans or other hard to digest short chain sugars.
     
    littleme and darben like this.
  17. darben

    darben Well-Known Forumite

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2007
    Messages:
    1,297
    Likes Received:
    516
    Get a spiralizer you can turn veg into noodles / spaghetti - courgettes are the simplest to convert and look the most pasta like - if you like you say you have a lot of pasta / noodle meals you should be able to have a lot of the same food without making vast reinventions to your evening meals.
    Update
    Sorry didn’t see the date on the thread and apologies to the person who had already suggested the same I hadn’t read the whole thread through
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2017

Share This Page