Does anyone know..?

littleme

250,000th poster!
How much from Perrys? If you don't mind me asking.
Not sure, the carer spent £18.00, he bought 3 faggots (1 to many) a large thick (2ins thick) fillet steak, and some Shropshire blue cheese.... He thinks the steak may have cost around £12.00. Guesses on a postcard please...
 

EasMid

Well-Known Forumite
A bit late now but Canalside Farm Shop do their own recipe faggots in the butchery. Haven’t had any for a while but they were pretty good last time.
Must give them a try again.
Just trying to find done decent pease pudding now though.
 

Trumpet

Well-Known Forumite
A bit late now but Canalside Farm Shop do their own recipe faggots in the butchery. Haven’t had any for a while but they were pretty good last time.
Must give them a try again.
Just trying to find done decent pease pudding now though.
Conways in Willenhall do trays of four with gravy for £2.50.
 

Studio Tan

Well-Known Forumite
There’s a vague rumour going around that since yesterday USA, Russia, China and North Korea have been engaged in a fierce nuclear war and that so many missiles have already been released that the earth has been shifted off its axis. No mention on the news though.
 

littleme

250,000th poster!
.... If I was an evil overlord in the world today, and I wanted to get rid off all the Hydrogen in the world..... How would I go about it?

(I believe burning it isn't an option)
 

BobClay

Well-Known Forumite
Build thousands of Hindenburg style Airships and fill them full of smokers and send them on their way. (Two birds with one stone. :heyhey:) I'm assuming you mean free Hydrogen gas and not Hydrogen bound in compounds. If you remove all the Hydrogen compounds, you'll kill everything on the planet.

If you insist on not burning it, pipe it to the top of Mt Everest, and just release it. It's the lightest element so it will just float away to the top of the atmosphere.

Be advised though that Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the Universe, and is just about in everything as a compound (water for instance) and your task is not without some difficulties. :P
 

littleme

250,000th poster!
Build thousands of Hindenburg style Airships and fill them full of smokers and send them on their way. (Two birds with one stone. :heyhey:) I'm assuming you mean free Hydrogen gas and not Hydrogen bound in compounds. If you remove all the Hydrogen compounds, you'll kill everything on the planet.

If you insist on not burning it, pipe it to the top of Mt Everest, and just release it. It's the lightest element so it will just float away to the top of the atmosphere.

Be advised though that Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the Universe, and is just about in everything as a compound (water for instance) and your task is not without some difficulties. :P
Thank you! If I wanted to make more Hydrogen, how would I do that?

Or if I burnt it all, would it all turn back to water?


*answer appreciated as if I was a 5yr old, not an adult.

**Also, I'm not planning world domination. Yet.
 

Gramaisc

Forum O. G.
Thank you! If I wanted to make more Hydrogen, how would I do that?

Or if I burnt it all, would it all turn back to water?


*answer appreciated as if I was a 5yr old, not an adult.

**Also, I'm not planning world domination. Yet.
A run-of-the-mill human fart will be mostly hydrogen - that's a good start.
 

BobClay

Well-Known Forumite
You can generate Hydrogen by electrolysis, basically you stick a couple of electrodes in pure water and pass a current through it. Oxygen is released at one electrode, and Hydrogen at the other. It bubbles up to the surface.

If you burn Hydrogen you will get some water vapour, remember the balloon experiment at school. Stick a long lighted taper up to a Hydrogen filled balloon, you get an explosion and a bit of damp. Be advised, Hydrogen is dangerous stuff.

If you can heat it up enough, and contain it somehow, you can get Hydrogen to fuse into Helium with a colossal release of energy. Hence the Sun (Hydrogen powered) and thermonuclear weapons. All the water in the world wont save you then. :eek:
 

Noah

Well-Known Forumite
Electrolysis of water or sulphuric acid & zinc are ideas that creep back from my schooldays.

It would all turn back to water if there was enough oxygen,
 

BobClay

Well-Known Forumite
A Helium filled airship I would enter no problem. I wouldn't even begin to entertain a Hydrogen filled one. There was a bit of politics involved insomuch as although Helium is the second most abundant element in the Universe, it is actually quite rare on Earth. During the 30's the US produced most of the Helium from mine seepage, and used it for their airships. They wouldn't release it because it was rare and so valuable.
These days Helium is much in demand for cryogenic use, and some isotopes might be extremely useful for nuclear fusion reactors. We really shouldn't be wasting it in balloons.
 
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littleme

250,000th poster!
If you burn Hydrogen you will get some water vapour, remember the balloon experiment at school. Stick a long lighted taper up to a Hydrogen filled balloon, you get an explosion and a bit of damp. Be advised, Hydrogen is dangerous stuff.

No, I don't! I went to school in the 80's, and girls weren't allowed to study either chemistry of physics at that time.... Hence my weird questions.

At the moment I'm seeing a 'atom' as an ingredient, and a 'molecule' as a recipe.... My question stems from reading that (true or not) somewhere in America, electric cars are being charged by a diesel generator, which users more diesel than the cars would have used had they been normal diesel fuelled cars. Hydrogen seems to be the next cleanest 'fuel', but is it?
 

BobClay

Well-Known Forumite
Well it's certainly clean (unless it's in a Hydrogen bomb, that's a bit messy.) But because it reacts with just about anything it can you have to use energy to extract it from compounds, and storing it could be dangerous.
 

Gramaisc

Forum O. G.
The US helium-filled airships were not immune to incidents.

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Most "peacetime" airship crashes weren't really related to the hydrogen/helium issue.

The Hindenburg had the misfortune to do it very publicly - most of the other crashes were rather more private affairs.

Even with the Hindenburg, there were 35 fatalities and 62 survivors.
 

BobClay

Well-Known Forumite
I was at Kingston, all boys school, so wouldn't know about that. Certainly in my final years working in a school girls got the same science as boys. But that was only 10 years or so ago. Science institutions have a lot to answer for with regard to female scientists over the decades in terms of discrimination. I believe Cambridge wouldn't offer females degrees up until 1948. Yet when you think of some of the outstanding lady scientists of history, it was a stupid attitude.
 
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