Safety of Women at Night scheme.

littleme

250,000th poster!
To be fair to the police, a neighbour had reason to call the police this morning, they responded with their presence within 10 minutes. Not a good outcome either.
 

Theresa Green

Well-Known Forumite
Land transport, suicide, accidental poisoning

Top 3 killers for young people in Western Europe


The UK comes 29th in the world for life expectancy


Become Japanese, take planes, eat well
 

littleme

250,000th poster!
Land transport, suicide, accidental poisoning

Top 3 killers for young people in Western Europe


The UK comes 29th in the world for life expectancy


Become Japanese, take planes, eat well
Turning Japanese, I think I'm turning Japanese, I really think so...

Suicide Forest anyone....


 

DoggedWalker

Active Member
Nonsense. Don't tell me what my fears are. My fears are that my daughter us likely to be a victim of assault, of sexual assault, of abduction. If I had a son, he is less likely to be a victim.
Thank you for entirely proving my point.

All the crimes you describe are rare, and even less likely when the offender is a complete stranger.

When it comes to violence men are significantly more likely to be victims from the most minor of offences to the most significant - murder. Check the ONS crime data and you’ll see this for yourself.
 

SketchyMagpie

Well-Known Forumite
Thank you for entirely proving my point.

All the crimes you describe are rare, and even less likely when the offender is a complete stranger.

When it comes to violence men are significantly more likely to be victims from the most minor of offences to the most significant - murder. Check the ONS crime data and you’ll see this for yourself.
Men experience higher rates of pretty much all physical violence except domestic abuse, rape and other sexual assault.

You're posting the same nonsense angle spouted by the "manosphere" sections of the internet all over and it all spectacularly misses the point.

The real issue here beyond the violence itself, as it nearly always comes down to, is the focus being on "keeping women safe" rather than "stopping men from committing violent acts".
 
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littleme

250,000th poster!
Thank you for entirely proving my point.

All the crimes you describe are rare, and even less likely when the offender is a complete stranger.

When it comes to violence men are significantly more likely to be victims from the most minor of offences to the most significant - murder. Check the ONS crime data and you’ll see this for yourself.
Women are more likely to be subject to violence from a man, men are more likely to be subject to violence from a man than a woman, they're also more likely to be violent themselves (ie able to defend themselves from violence from men).


I think you have no idea as to what women may suffer regarding violence/abuse and threatening behaviour, day to day we suffer from derogatory comments/slurs/innuendos... It's still acceptable among 'some' people as 'normal'.

As a man, (presuming) do you have to worry that someone is walking to close to you at night, have they crossed the Rd to be near to you, are they following you, have they speeded up to catch up with you, have they slowed down so you catch up to them, are they stood in a corner/shady place to shock/surprise you, will you talk to me/try to engage in conversation with me, and for what reason... Do you have to think you can't go running late at night in the dark, walk back to your car park after a late shift at work, or go on your own to meet friends in town? Do you worry that you can't put your drink down because it might get spiked? There are so many things that run through women's heads if they are out late at night.... But yes, men are at risk of the same things too, although on the whole better able to defend themselves.
 

littleme

250,000th poster!
Men experience higher rates of pretty much all physical violence except domestic abuse, rape and other sexual assault.

This is the same nonsense spouted by the "manosphere" sections of the internet all over and it all spectacularly misses the point.

The real issue here, as it nearly always comes down to, is the focus being on "keeping women safe" rather than "stopping men from committing violent acts".
Brilliantly said x
 

Just little old me:)

Active Member
Thank you for entirely proving my point.

All the crimes you describe are rare, and even less likely when the offender is a complete stranger.

When it comes to violence men are significantly more likely to be victims from the most minor of offences to the most significant - murder. Check the ONS crime data and you’ll see this for yourself.
If a persons mum and dad are both far from home in an unsafe place late at night and need to get home and You have the ability to get one of them home safely whilst the other would be left to make their own way home who would you grant safe passage too?
I believe in equality for both sexes but am very much old fashioned in a good way and would willingly put myself at risk to ensure a lady got home safely. I would separate the argument of equality of the sexes from safety as these are totally separate discussions.
At the end of the day it's about being able to make the right decision as to who will most benefit from your help and who is most likely to be ok by their own means. Just hope as my daughter gets older she meets someone with views like mine and not yours👍
 

staffordjas

Well-Known Forumite
In the 70's I used to walk home alone from Top of the World in the early hours , as my mate lived in highfields so went the other way . Most times I felt safe , but there there was the one time a bloke was following me. There was another man walking home infront , so I ran after him and asked if I could walk with him as I was scared....resulting in the poor bloke being beaten up by the bloke who'd been following me. I ran and hid in a garden as I was so scared ( no mobile phones in those days) . I feel so shit for the bloke being beaten up because he let me walk with him.

The RAF & visiting army lads in the Grapes learnt me unarmed combat after that , but afraid if If I was attacked by a strong bloke , I wouldn't stand a chance .

I feel a lot less safe nowadays , especially this afternoon/evening when me and hubby walked to town early for a drink.

One Police car was in the market square , then it moved on to outside Hogarths which we had decided to try for the first time. Cyclists riding past the cop car in a non-cycling area , obviously knowing the police as there was banter between them "What's the guy in the car been doing? Cycling as well?" The cops just laughed . The cop car was just hanging parked up around town , was wondering if this is the 'Safety of women at night' scheme.....

5.30pm even with hubby with me I didn't feel comfortable walking through town !

If it came to it , and hubby was attacked . he could put up a reasonable fight. But with knives etc involved nowadays there isn't much chance of coming out of it unscathed :hmm:
 
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Just little old me:)

Active Member
To put a context on this less than 5% of the UK prison population is female and over 95% is male
So if you're a person who is more affraid/vulnerable to attack from a male (whether female or LGBTQIA+ or POC) then it highlights the extra police presence needed to keep all of these people safe.
I find it soul destroying that 40 years on from the era that I grew up in that as a society we still do not fully accept people for people and it saddens me even more to think that this equality for all will not still not be achieved in my lifetime if ever at all.
 

SketchyMagpie

Well-Known Forumite
To put a context on this less than 5% of the UK prison population is female and over 95% is male
So if you're a person who is more affraid/vulnerable to attack from a male (whether female or LGBTQIA+ or POC) then it highlights the extra police presence needed to keep all of these people safe.
I find it soul destroying that 40 years on from the era that I grew up in that as a society we still do not fully accept people for people and it saddens me even more to think that this equality for all will not still not be achieved in my lifetime if ever at all.
I'm 38 years old. Last year I watched the Netflix documentary on Peter Sutcliffe, someone I obviously knew about but I'd never really seen any of the societal reaction to the murders and I was absolutely stunned to see how familiar it felt to the aftermath of Sarah Everard's death. Many of the vox pops with female members of the public from either time could easily be swapped and fit right in with the opposite era.

The vigils and protests from 2021 really felt like a paradigm shift to me as somebody who had never really seen (or recalled) anything like it before and so to then see those identical scenes from the 70s was a real "..... oh" moment for me.
 

staffordjas

Well-Known Forumite
I'm 38 years old. Last year I watched the Netflix documentary on Peter Sutcliffe, someone I obviously knew about but I'd never really seen any of the societal reaction to the murders and I was absolutely stunned to see how familiar it felt to the aftermath of Sarah Everard's death. Many of the vox pops with female members of the public from either time could easily be swapped and fit right in with the opposite era.

The vigils and protests from 2021 really felt like a paradigm shift to me as somebody who had never really seen (or recalled) anything like it before and so to then see those identical scenes from the 70s was a real "..... oh" moment for me.
I'd been running around Bathpool park just previous to the Lesley Whittle Murder by Peter Sutcliffe. Made it even more scary!
Even now seeing Whittle coaches (don't think it's anything to do with original family firm....) as I drive down the motorway makes me go cold.

Just before Christine Derby body was found on Cannock Chase (Raymond Morris killer ) , a car similar to that linked to her disappearance stopped and offered me a lift to school one day and was most insistant. I made a run for it after my parents had luckily pointed out what sort of car to watch out for. Rather scary thinking what could have happened!
 
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Gramaisc

Forum O. G.
I'd been running around Bathpool park just previous to the Lesley Whittle Murder by Peter Sutcliffe. Made it even more scary!
Even now seeing Whittle coaches (don't think it's anything to do with original family firm....) as I drive down the motorway makes me go cold.
To be fair to Peter Sutcliffe(..?), Lesley Whittle was killed by Donald Neilson.
 

Just little old me:)

Active Member
I'm 38 years old. Last year I watched the Netflix documentary on Peter Sutcliffe, someone I obviously knew about but I'd never really seen any of the societal reaction to the murders and I was absolutely stunned to see how familiar it felt to the aftermath of Sarah Everard's death. Many of the vox pops with female members of the public from either time could easily be swapped and fit right in with the opposite era.

The vigils and protests from 2021 really felt like a paradigm shift to me as somebody who had never really seen (or recalled) anything like it before and so to then see those identical scenes from the 70s was a real "..... oh" moment for me.
My fear is that the starting sequence to the original film Planet of the apes isn't about how it started but more about how the Human race will always be.
To look up to women and want to be chivalrous (as old fashioned as it may seem) is now deemed out dated and treated with great suspicion as it's so rare but for me it's as important as using my manners.
But still scary how the Human race pays lip service to equality but not on every level.
 

proactive

Enjoying a drop of red.
My fear is that the starting sequence to the original film Planet of the apes isn't about how it started but more about how the Human race will always be.
To look up to women and want to be chivalrous (as old fashioned as it may seem) is now deemed out dated and treated with great suspicion as it's so rare but for me it's as important as using my manners.
But still scary how the Human race pays lip service to equality but not on every level.
When I first started full time work, my line manager was a woman, who made a massive deal about being a feminist.

My collegue, who started at the same time as me, once held the door open for her in a corridor is she walked directly behind him. She accused him of being a sexist pig.

Same corridor, next day, she was right behind me and I let the door slam back into her. She accused me of being an ignorant prat.

Some people just won't be happy, regardless of how they identify.
 

Gramaisc

Forum O. G.
I know what my new signature quote is going to be when the antivaxxers have moved on... XD
Not words I ever expected to read :lorks:
I do remember both cases fairly well.

A lad at the Poly with me had a car that was very like one that Neilson used - same model and colour, and the number plate was an anagram - he got run off the road enough times for it to be a reasonable prospect that he could become, effectively, an indirect, innocent, proxy victim.

A friend's father was a lorry driver who had such a resemblance to Sutcliffe that he could have played him in a film - he was interviewed several times.
 

DoggedWalker

Active Member
The continuation of this thread only amplifies my point. Peter Sutcliffe and Wayne Couzens are extreme events. Incredibly rare, highly unlikely and a couple of taxi marshals won’t stop them. The fact Suttcliffe is still spoken about is a case in point. How many domestic murder victims (or perpetrators) could you name?

The facts are very clear, women are much more likely to be the victim of a sexual offence than men, but this is MUCH more likely to be perpetrated by a person they know. Stranger crime are rare.

If you want to acknowledge that this is about making people FEEL safe rather than actually making a meaningful difference, fine, I accept that. But if you wanted to make more women safe with that money, it’s better spent on domestic violence refuges, housing for women, specialist policing and prosecutors and civil injunctions. That WOULD make women safer. For me though, it shouldn’t be policing the fear of crime, it should be doing meaningful things with tax payers money.

Taxi bouncers and cctv are going to do more about drunken male on male violence than anything else.

But, hey, if it makes you feel safer *shrug*.
 
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