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Gardening tips

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by db, Oct 29, 2007.

  1. Gramaisc

    Gramaisc Forum O. G.

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    You can accidentally shake the seeds out of them. They'll grow fairly easily for you. Scatter them in the intended locations and wait. - you won't get the flowers in the first year, they are biennials, from the second year on, they should organise themselves, if they're happy with the locations.

    Because of the biennial issue, it's worth initially sowing them for two successive years, to hide the 'first year' effect in the future.

    Be careful not to treat the first year growths as weeds...
     
    proactive and littleme like this.
  2. Gramaisc

    Gramaisc Forum O. G.

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    I got this years ago at the boot sale, on the basis that I thought I knew what it might be. It looks 'factory made', but I've never been able to find anything similar on the internet. It's just had a tart-up and I've started using properly at last.

    DSC_0516.JPG

    DSC_0517.JPG


    I imagine that this is its intended use - to get a nice dropped edge around a lawn. It takes a bit of sorting out for the first few passes, especially in stony ground - after that, it's a fairly straightforward procedure.

    DSC_0518.JPG

    It's pushed against the vertical face by the force from the 'ploughshare' and pulled down by its own weight and the reaction from the 'lift' from the nose of the ploughshare, this being controlled by the adjustable plate that rides along the grassed surface.

    It works quite well and will aid in reducing 'creep' into the borders. It does have a bit of a tendency to drag material along in the same direction all the time, but that can easily be sorted out, once in a blue moon...
     
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  3. Lucy

    Lucy Well-Known Forumite

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    I bet we have 100 foxgloves in the garden this year. All self set. I don't think you can do it by cuttings as they are annuals.
     
  4. Gramaisc

    Gramaisc Forum O. G.

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    Although the point about cuttings remains true, they're actually biennials, only flowering in the second year - and the first year's growths can look a bit like weeds to the overenthusiastic gardener. Two year's propagation in a suitable place will find them carrying on without your interference. You can start the seeds in pots, if you like, as with most other things.
     
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  5. Noah

    Noah Well-Known Forumite

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    Take a few seed pods not lots.
     
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  6. Glam

    Glam Mad Cat Woman

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    Please don't forget, every part of the foxglove is poisonous, to both humans and animals.
     
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  7. littleme

    littleme 250,000th poster!

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    Pretty flowers in a messy garden to cheer us up on a dull rainy day...

    IMG_20200718_163752.jpg
     

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