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Marine Pictures and Videos

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by BobClay, Jul 20, 2020.

  1. BobClay

    BobClay Well-Known Forumite

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    A picture taken in Wellington, New Zealand dated 1889. One reason I like this pix is because it shows that drawn out rollover from sail to steam.

    Sail, sail and steam, steam. (These days most Merchant ships are diesel powered.)

    Wellington1889a.jpg
     
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  2. BobClay

    BobClay Well-Known Forumite

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    X boats or midget submarines at Gosport Submarine Museum, all part of the Portsmouth Naval Museum. They have one of these split into three, so you can look inside it .. (I couldn't stand up straight inside to give you an idea.) I can only say the crews who manned these things had guts in armfuls. Those bulges you see on the side were all high explosive, and these subs would get under their target, and drop the charges and get the hell out (hopefully.)
    In the summer of 1943 three of these attacked the Battleship Tirpitz in a Norwegian fjord. The mission cost was very high, but they managed to put considerable damage on the German ship which knocked her out of the war for nearly a year.
    When I took these pix I half expected to see John Mills sitting inside them ...

    Xboatb.jpg

    The engine room, such as it is:
    Xboata.jpg

    Not for the claustrophobic:
    Xboat.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2020 at 10:08 AM
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  3. BobClay

    BobClay Well-Known Forumite

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    Albatrosses will follow a ship for days, even weeks on end, Hitching a ride on the air currents generated by the moving vessel. They glide with barely a flap of the wing, I think the best flyers in the animal kingdom. Sometimes however, especially after a prolonged period of bad weather, they will end up on the ship as shown here on some unknown sailing ship.
    I've actually experienced a similar situation on a large bulk carrier going from Gladstone to Buenos Aires via Cape Horn. The South Pacific is very remote ocean down that way. After several days of bad weather two following albatrosses ended up on the main deck, somehow having got between the hatches, which had pipes on either side. We put food out for them, but they seemed completely disinterested. The Old Man was a bit superstitious, and wanted them off the the ship, so a few of us went down with broom handles and after a bit of tricky manoeuvring were able to lift them over the pipes at the side of the spaces between the hatches with a stick under each wing (they have enormous wing spans.) One simply hopped to the side of the ship and jumped into the sea, presumably he/she could take off from there, while the other raced off down the deck and got airborne, just clearing the handrails.
    We were all pretty chuffed about that.

    albatross.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2020 at 10:11 AM
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  4. Withnail

    Withnail Well-Known Forumite

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  5. BobClay

    BobClay Well-Known Forumite

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    HMS Venturer. Not just another RN World War Two submarine, but a ship with a unique history. Her story reads like an Alistair MacLean novel such as 'Where Eagles Dare' or 'The Guns of Navarone' wherein a small group of people are given a seemingly impossible mission, except this actually happened. She did something that had never been done before, and has never been done since. I'm stunned this hasn't led to a movie.

    On 9 February 1945 under the command of Lt Jimmy Launders, HMS/m Venturer was the first, and to date, the only submarine to sink another submarine while both were submerged.

    This was quite a feat considering he had to work out a 3-dimensional fire control solution to attack a zig-zagging submerged target, using his passive hydrophones as his prime sensor! After following U-864 for several hours hoping for the German boat to surface, he eventually fired all 4 bow torpedoes at his Target 17.5 seconds apart with different depth settings, the fourth Torpedo hit U-864 midships and she imploded and went to the bottom, sadly taking all hands with her.

    The actual target for her mission was to was find and sink U-864 - who was on her way to Japan with Jet engine designs & parts, missile guidance systems (from the V2) and tonnes of Mercury in flasks as part of Germany's Operation Caesar. U-864s approximate position in the North Sea, west of Bergen had been identified by Enigma interceptions of her signals at Bletchley Park. Signalled by Submarine Command, Venturer homed in on the ‘datum’ - Launders then detected her using Hydrophones and latterly confirmed her as the target using his periscope.

    Launders tactical genius and the application of his mathematical flair to the huge problems he faced of getting a workable firing solution on a passive target with a variable course, speed and depth that could only be tracked using sound (like a 3-D game of chess with your eyes closed!) all without the aid of a computer. It's hard to believe that Venturer was only his second boat, having left general service (HMS Repulse) in 1941!

    Venturer had a successful war, sinking 13 German ships and another U-boat - U771 during her previous 10 patrols - earning him a DSO, he got a bar to that DSO for sinking U-864 and her invaluable cargo.

    After the war - Venturer would serve under the Norwegian ensign as HNoMS Utstein until she was scrapped in 1964, Launders served in the RN until he retired as a Captain in 1974, he died in 1988.

    hmsm_venturer.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2020 at 1:42 PM
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  6. Withnail

    Withnail Well-Known Forumite

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