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Aviation Videos.

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Gramaisc, Apr 17, 2012.

  1. joshua

    joshua Well-Known Forumite

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    Brittany Ferries explores high-speed seaglider service that will cross Channel to France from Portsmouth in just 40 minutes
    PASSENGERS could whizz across to France from Portsmouth in just 40 minutes on a new high-speed seaglider dreamed up in an ambitious project.
    By Kimberley Barber
    Tuesday, 15th June 2021, 10:24 am
    Updated Tuesday, 15th June 2021, 3:29 pm
    The craft, an all-electric, wing-in-ground effect vehicle (WIG) which travels six times faster than a ferry, is under development in the United States through Boston-based start-up Regent (Regional Electric Ground Effect Nautical Transport), and Brittany Ferries is exploring its potential.

    The ferry firm, which operates services to France and Spain from Portsmouth, Plymouth and Poole, has signed a letter of intent which could see seagliders with a 50-150 passenger capacity sailing between the UK and France by 2028.

    Regent, which is working on several craft on different sizes, expects the first commercial passengers to travel on its smaller electric craft by 2025.
    [​IMG]

    Brittany Ferries is exploring the potential for a new high-speed, sustainable and more efficient form of ferry travel called a seaglider The concept, an all-electric, wing-in-ground effect vehicle (WIG), is under development in the United States through Boston-based start-up REGENT (Regional Electric Ground Effect Nautical Transport).
    Frédéric Pouget, ports and operations director for Brittany Ferries, said: ‘Seaglider is an attractive and exciting concept and we look forward to working with Regent in the months and years to come.

    ‘We are particularly pleased to contribute now because it means we can bring real-world challenges and potential applications into the company’s thinking at an early stage.

    ‘We hope this may help bring commercial success in the years that follow. Who knows; this could be the birth of ferries that fly across the Channel.’[​IMG]
    Brittany Ferries is exploring the potential for a new high-speed, sustainable and more efficient form of ferry travel called a seaglider The concept, an all-electric, wing-in-ground effect vehicle (WIG), is under development in the United States through Boston-based start-up REGENT (Regional Electric Ground Effect Nautical Transport).
    Seagliders combine the convenience of passenger ferries with the comfort of hydrofoils, the aerodynamic efficiency of hovercraft and the speed of aircraft.

    With the potential to connect existing ferry ports, the craft are expected to fly at speeds of up to 180 mph with a battery-powered range of 180 miles.

    The voyage from Portsmouth to Cherbourg, for example, could be covered in as little as 40 minutes.

    The seagliders work by harnessing a concept well-known to pilots – ground effect. This is the cushion created by high-pressure air trapped between wings and the ground or water while flying at low altitude.[​IMG]
    Brittany Ferries is exploring the potential for a new high-speed, sustainable and more efficient form of ferry travel called a seaglider The concept, an all-electric, wing-in-ground effect vehicle (WIG), is under development in the United States through Boston-based start-up REGENT (Regional Electric Ground Effect Nautical Transport).
    Seagliders are therefore akin to a hovercraft with wings, rather than a skirt.

    Billy Thalheimer, co-founder and chief executive of Regent, said: ‘Regent is excited to partner with Brittany Ferries to bring the future of maritime transportation to market.

    ‘Brittany Ferries offers world-class operational experience which will help Regent ensure that our seagliders will be the most convenient and comfortable form of cross-Channel travel.’
     
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  2. Gramaisc

    Gramaisc Forum O. G.

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    I wonder if any of the old Ekranoplans are for sale?

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. BobClay

    BobClay Well-Known Forumite

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    Must have been bloody noisy in that cockpit .... :eek:
     
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  4. joshua

    joshua Well-Known Forumite

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    That was the cockpit ejection system, whole front end detaches and flies off to safety
     
  5. Gramaisc

    Gramaisc Forum O. G.

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    Interesting use of the word 'safety'.
     
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  6. Entropy

    Entropy Well-Known Forumite

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    You have to admire the Soviet way of thinking and the engineering developments they made

     
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  7. Gramaisc

    Gramaisc Forum O. G.

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    e.g.,


    [​IMG]
     
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  8. BobClay

    BobClay Well-Known Forumite

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    Eight engines .... ??? HAH !!! ... Who needs tham ? :P

    FourEngines.jpg
     
  9. Entropy

    Entropy Well-Known Forumite

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    Stumbled across this short video on the Gloster Javelin or the flying flat Iron..

     
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  10. BobClay

    BobClay Well-Known Forumite

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    Used to be one of those parked at the gates of 16 MU long ago. Would pass it on the way to the Astra Cinema (if we were chancing entry at the main gate, didn't always work.) :)
     
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  11. Entropy

    Entropy Well-Known Forumite

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    This has probably been posted on here before, but I think it needs to be seen again

    My dad flew in these as SAC between 1964-68 - the short lived, but spectacular Blackburn Beverley C1



    Additionally, there is a project to save and restore the last remaining Beverley at Fort Paull too

    https://www.blackburnbeverley.co.uk/

     
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  12. Gramaisc

    Gramaisc Forum O. G.

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    It was chopped up for scrap, because it was 'dangerous'.
     
  13. Gramaisc

    Gramaisc Forum O. G.

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    The Beverley was a wonderfully bonkers thing - a good example of the "if nobody else used it, it might be a bit iffy" rule.

    Although you could fly it with the back of the cargo area fully open and drop big things, you couldn't open the doors in flight. You had to take them off, leave them there, fly off with the back open, do the drop, then come back and refit them. They carried aluminium scaffolding to help with this task.

    It would actually go backwards, and driving them back for the longest possible run was a common enough tactic, particularly during the disputes around Aden.

    But, at least you couldn't forget to put the wheels down.
     
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  14. Gramaisc

    Gramaisc Forum O. G.

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    This shows why opening the back doors in flight was always going to be awkward.

    [​IMG]


    And this shows one of the few aircraft ever to be written off by running over a land mine.

    [​IMG]
     
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  15. Entropy

    Entropy Well-Known Forumite

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    My dad has many many stories of sketchy operations with the Beverley. Most notably the paratrooper drop door in the tail boom, being a place you dont want to find yourself falling asleep on.

    He spent most of his time in the forward nose section watching the world go by as he flew in and around the various bases dotted about in the Middle East and to Hong Kong.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2021
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  16. Entropy

    Entropy Well-Known Forumite

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  17. joshua

    joshua Well-Known Forumite

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  18. Gramaisc

    Gramaisc Forum O. G.

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    There was a modification to the boom drop door, to interlock it with the toilet door, after some poor unfortunate bloke fell through the hatch after it was opened while he was working in there with the door shut. It was on the ground and stationary, but it's still a very long way down to the concrete.
     
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  19. Gramaisc

    Gramaisc Forum O. G.

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  20. joshua

    joshua Well-Known Forumite

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