Gardening tips

Gramaisc

Forum O. G.
Ok thanks for that.
Now I’m not sure if this is possible, legal or moral but on my regular walk I’ve noticed wild foxgloves. Is it possible to take cuttings? And if it is how best is it to do ?
You can accidentally shake the seeds out of them. They'll grow fairly easily for you. Scatter them in the intended locations and wait. - you won't get the flowers in the first year, they are biennials, from the second year on, they should organise themselves, if they're happy with the locations.

Because of the biennial issue, it's worth initially sowing them for two successive years, to hide the 'first year' effect in the future.

Be careful not to treat the first year growths as weeds...
 

Gramaisc

Forum O. G.
I got this years ago at the boot sale, on the basis that I thought I knew what it might be. It looks 'factory made', but I've never been able to find anything similar on the internet. It's just had a tart-up and I've started using properly at last.

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I imagine that this is its intended use - to get a nice dropped edge around a lawn. It takes a bit of sorting out for the first few passes, especially in stony ground - after that, it's a fairly straightforward procedure.

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It's pushed against the vertical face by the force from the 'ploughshare' and pulled down by its own weight and the reaction from the 'lift' from the nose of the ploughshare, this being controlled by the adjustable plate that rides along the grassed surface.

It works quite well and will aid in reducing 'creep' into the borders. It does have a bit of a tendency to drag material along in the same direction all the time, but that can easily be sorted out, once in a blue moon...
 

Lucy

Well-Known Forumite
I bet we have 100 foxgloves in the garden this year. All self set. I don't think you can do it by cuttings as they are annuals.
 

Gramaisc

Forum O. G.
I bet we have 100 foxgloves in the garden this year. All self set. I don't think you can do it by cuttings as they are annuals.
Although the point about cuttings remains true, they're actually biennials, only flowering in the second year - and the first year's growths can look a bit like weeds to the overenthusiastic gardener. Two year's propagation in a suitable place will find them carrying on without your interference. You can start the seeds in pots, if you like, as with most other things.
 

rudie111

Well-Known Forumite
I have some gerberas planted in pots. Something seems to be getting to the petals before the buds open properly. Any ideas?
 

littleme

250,000th poster!
Thanks but I was rather hoping one of our garden centres round here might stock it so that I can see the quality before I buy. Bought some ages ago from Aldi but this winter seems to have finished them off. Aldi have never had any in since.
Ahhh soz I just googled 'buy gaillardia plants'... Adding nearby doesn't bring much else up...
 

Bob

Well-Known Forumite
Does anyone know anywhere in the area that sells Gaillardia plants?

Might be worth making a couple of calls before heading out. Fletchers and Johnson Hall are my go to garden centres, usually pretty good for variety.
 
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