Movie clips

BobClay

Well-Known Forumite
When we think of James Cagney of Hollywood's yesteryear we think of him leaning out of a window with a Tommy Gun shouting: "You'll never take me alive copppper !!!" (Apparently in any gangster film he ever made he never once said: "You dirty raaat !!" )

But he was a song and dance man first !! .... a hoofer as they say in the States.

 

BobClay

Well-Known Forumite
The final scenes of what has always been one of my favourite films set in World War Two. Loosely based on fact, it tells the story of an art obsessed German officer (Paul Scofield) who attempts to ship a museum full of great paintings back to Germany via rail as the allies approach Paris. He is opposed by a French railway man Burt Lancaster in a bitter and violent struggle to stop the train. Directed in visceral black and white by John Frankenheimer, it is an ultimately sad film not in the business of glorification.

 

BobClay

Well-Known Forumite
Not able to sleep I got up in the early hours a few nights ago just as 'Easy Rider' was being shown on the box. I remember seeing this at the Picture House, (I think, could have been the Odeon) roughly when it came out.
Looks phenomenally dated now with its quirky direction from Dennis Hopper but it had a soundtrack to die for, including this track from The Byrds big hit cover of a Pete Seeger song. It had a much different effect on me this time than when I saw it back then (69/70 or thereabouts.)
In some respects it played a part in showing the death knell of the Sixties, to quote Peter Fonda near the end of the movie: 'We blew it."
Crappy resolution on the video, but much better on my telly ... (probably better than the Picture House. :rolleyes:)

 
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BobClay

Well-Known Forumite
Alan Rickman demonstrating with Tom Selleck that you need to be careful when doing your research:

 

BobClay

Well-Known Forumite
I think Ennio Morricone was at his very best with the music for this scene. It's literally operatic. And that camera on a crane shot rising up is just magic. Claudia Cardinale wondering why her new family isn't there to meet her ... not realising they were all dead. (Killed by Henry Fonda .... can you believe that ... !!! :eek:) Monument Valley !! That bit wasn't filmed in Spain for sure.

 

BobClay

Well-Known Forumite
I'm not really a superhero fan (apart from Hancock and Deadpool which were funny.) But I still think Heath Ledger stole this film with his frightening portrayal of the 'Joker.'
He was anything but a joke .... :eek:

 

BobClay

Well-Known Forumite
Was sad to see today that George Segal has died. Always rated him. He was good in films like King Rat and The Quiller Memorandum, but he could turn to comedy easily too. Quentin Tarantino rated Quiller as the best spy movie of the 60's.

 

BobClay

Well-Known Forumite
George Segal as the central character in King Rat. A film set in the Japanese prisoner of war camp Changi in Singapore. Based on the book by James Clavell, who also helped write the screen play. James Clavell based the story on his own experience as a prisoner in Changi.
It's a pretty grim film as you might expect given the subject. It also had an impressive cast.

 

BobClay

Well-Known Forumite
Made more then 50 years ago this film still stands the test of time as one of the greatest police thrillers ever. It started all the car chase stuff in subsequent films, and even in that without the later special effects it still holds its ground. It is essentially an all American film with the King of Cool Steve McQueen, and yet it had a British director Peter Yates with his own particular style. He cut his teeth on episodes of TV series like 'The Saint' and 'Danger Man.'
Always a film worth watching again.

 

Gramaisc

Forum O. G.
Made more then 50 years ago this film still stands the test of time as one of the greatest police thrillers ever. It started all the car chase stuff in subsequent films, and even in that without the later special effects it still holds its ground. It is essentially an all American film with the King of Cool Steve McQueen, and yet it had a British director Peter Yates with his own particular style. He cut his teeth on episodes of TV series like 'The Saint' and 'Danger Man.'
Always a film worth watching again.

I remember seeing an interview with him where he was asked what changes he might make, if he could remake it.

He said that they shouldn't have kept putting the hub caps back on....
 

EasMid

Well-Known Forumite
Saw this first time round at the Odeon, brilliant film. It was on the tv a few months back & I watched it then. It wasn’t the same on the small screen but, as you say it stands the test of time.
(Pity I can’t say the same for “Fritz the cat”
 

BobClay

Well-Known Forumite
It started as film, a good one. Then it spun onto TV, not normally a formula for success you might think. But in this case, it not only worked, it actually surpassed the film .....

 

Gramaisc

Forum O. G.
It started as film, a good one. Then it spun onto TV, not normally a formula for success you might think. But in this case, it not only worked, it actually surpassed the film .....

There are some clips on You Tube of the TV version with the 'laughter track' on - it's atrocious.

Whoever decided to remove it for the UK broadcasts was a true artist.
 
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