What book are we reading at the moment?

Carole

Well-Known Forumite
When on holiday I generally like, if possible to read a book set where I’m currently based.
For example, last summer in Norfolk I read the Ruth Galloway novels by Elly Griffiths, set in North Norfolk.

Now, in Devon, I’m reading The Long Call, a Murder mystery by Ann Cleeves, set in North Devon around the Ilfracombe and Barnstable area, the area where our campsite is.
Some of you may know that Ann Cleeves wrote Vera and Shetland both of which have been adapted for TV.
This book features a new detective.

I’ve just found out today that The Long Call is also being adapted for TV, they were filming in Ilfracombe quite recently.
 

tek-monkey

wanna see my snake?
When on holiday I generally like, if possible to read a book set where I’m currently based.
For example, last summer in Norfolk I read the Ruth Galloway novels by Elly Griffiths, set in North Norfolk.

Now, in Devon, I’m reading The Long Call, a Murder mystery by Ann Cleeves, set in North Devon around the Ilfracombe and Barnstable area, the area where our campsite is.
Some of you may know that Ann Cleeves wrote Vera and Shetland both of which have been adapted for TV.
This book features a new detective.

I’ve just found out today that The Long Call is also being adapted for TV, they were filming in Ilfracombe quite recently.
Loved Ilfracombe as a kid, especially the tiny museum near the front with the 2 faced cat in it
 

Thehooperman

Well-Known Forumite
I am currently reading the Boris corona book of absolute bollocks and have to admit it makes F all sense to me!

Hope the sequel is better!!
 

BobClay

Well-Known Forumite
I can't not read. These days I generally read at night prior to sleeping. I quite often read books I've already read over many years. If they're good, they're always good. Fiction and non-fiction, the non-fiction generally tends to be history or science, any science ... but I do have my favourites. Also if I read a new book by an author I don't know and enjoy it, I tend to read everything they've written Too many authors to list here, but from all genres
I cheat a bit now with a Kindle .... but I can barely move for bloody books in my place as it is, (right from textbooks I had at college in the sixties to paperbacks I bought long ago and appear to have become the home for tiny little bugs who I assume are reading, or eating them too. :P)

My old man used to thrust books into my hand and say: 'Read that.' I remember some of them, Catch 22, True Grit, The Ipcress File. My Old Dear was an Agatha Christie fanatic, I once astounded her as I was reading one of her books, Death on the Nile, by saying I'd already figured out who the killer was.
"To be sure you have," she replied sarcastically (she was Irish.) When I told her my idea she was astounded I'd figured it out. (I didn't let on I'd seen the film while at sea.)

TV and cinema are great. But much of that is sourced from books. Story telling is as old as the humanoid species gathered around a fire somewhere I suspect.
 

Carole

Well-Known Forumite
But the ending...?
Yes quite.
I’ve sent you a private message, it’s quite a popular book so I don’t want to discuss the ending in case someone else is reading it.


I can't not read. These days I generally read at night prior to sleeping. I quite often read books I've already read over many years. Also if I read a new book by an author I don't know and enjoy it, I tend to read everything they've written Too many authors to list here, but from all genres
I cheat a bit now with a Kindle .....


I can’t not read either, and I read anytime I’ve got a spare minute. I rarely read a book twice, there’s too many new books to be read to go back over old ones although there are some authors I will read again (Rose Tremain is my absolute favourite).

But for me it’s not just the reading, I like books. I like the feel of a book, I like to turn a page so I’ll never go kindle.
Husband’s got one, he keeps forgetting to charge it up.
I read different genres too. I love the way with a book you can get transported to another time, another place.
A person who knows the joy of reading will never be bored.
 

SketchyMagpie

Well-Known Forumite
I love to read, too. I wake up very early so I usually read for 40-60 minutes first thing and then again for around 20 in the evening. Also usually have an audiobook or podcasts on the go, though I find it difficult to follow fiction in that format so I usually just consume biographies or memoirs that way.

I bought a Kindle Paperwhite at the start of the pandemic so that I could get my books digitally and wouldn't be putting extra strain on deliveries and I'm a complete convert now. Apart from from the fact each page looks just like ink on paper and not a screen, I find it soooo much more comfortable to read with than holding a clunky book.

It's been about 5 years since I last read any Philip K Dick so decided to read 'Eye In The Sky' this week, not his best but it picked up a lot by the end.
 

SketchyMagpie

Well-Known Forumite
Sadly relevant but I just finished 'Men Who Hate Women' by Laura Bates (creator of the 'Everyday Sexism' project) which is all about incels and the online 'manosphere'. I thought I had a pretty accurate idea of that whole community (a mix of lonely men, misogynists and trolls, some of whom occasionally kill people) but I was taken aback by how much more a form of extremism it is.

If anybody wants to understand what happened in Plymouth a little better (it's easy to dismiss it as just a loner with mental health and anger issues) then I'd definitely recommend the book, particularly if the calls to classify this type of incident as an act of terrorism doesn't ring true for you. They will by the time you're finished.
 
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SketchyMagpie

Well-Known Forumite
Have been re-reading Gone Girl. Haven't seen the movie (I started watching it once but didn't like it), however the book is absolutely within my all-time top 5. SO good!

I've also been reading a book called 'Drums In The Distance' which is a journalistic account of how 'Hope Not Hate' have infiltrated various far-right movements in the west. Extremely interesting (and equally concerning) reading.
 
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